Back to Godhead January/February 2010

Average: 4.7 (3 votes)
January/February 2010

Hare Krishna devotees are known around the world for the public singing of the Hare Krishna mantra. Singing is one form of chanting, as devotees usually refer to the utterance of God's names. The other is the more private, meditative chanting on beads, used to keep track of the number of mantras chanted and as an aid to concentration.

Chanting on beads, called japa, is essential to the practice of bhakti-yoga. Understanding that Krishna, the Supreme Lord, is fully present in the sound of His name, sincere chanters constantly strive to improve the purity of their japa. In "Creating a Culture of Pure Chanting," Arcana Siddhi Devi Dasi tells of her experiences while attending a retreat dedicated to improving japa.

Another highlight of this issue is our story on Bhaktivedanta Hospital in Mumbai. Named for the founder of the Hare Krishna movement, the hospital is staffed by medical professionals who adhere to his teachings and offer patients the best in both physical and spiritual care.

"From Village to Village," another article set in India, tells of the efforts of Rupa Raghunatha Dasa to carry the teachings of Krishna consciousness to his country's villagers, who welcome him and his party with great respect and enthusiasm.

Hare Krishna.—Nagaraja Dasa, Editor

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Pure Chanting

Devotees take time to focus their efforts on their most important spiritual practice.

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Medicine Blends with Devotion

Bhaktivedanta Hospital in Mumbai provides care for the body, mind, and soul.

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Aspects of the Ayurvedic theory of medicine serve as a fit metaphor for the relationships the soul can have with Krishna.

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Accustomed to the technological advantages of the city, a devotee finds challenges and rewards in presenting Krishna consciousness to the villages of India.

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Srila Prabhupada explains why modern civilization poses dangers for those on the spiritual path.

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What makes bhakti, devotional service to Lord Krishna, the most pure, powerful, and exalted of all activities?